Metal Building Design Contractors for Your Facility

If you’re using steel construction in your office building, you need metal building design contractors to construct your facility. It’s important to have a team of experts who understand what you want and need for your operation. To complete this project, you’ll need financing, architectural advice, and a licensed general contractor to oversee the construction project.

Financing

To build a new commercial facility, you’ll need construction financing. Ideally, you’ll already have purchased the plot of land, so it’s paid off. If not, you may be able to roll the land into the construction financing. In order for a commercial lender to approve a loan for you, you’ll need to have the three C’s of cash, collateral, and credit. How much money do you have for a down payment? You’ll need at least 20% of the total projected cost. Collateral means you have property to back up the purchase. Having a good credit score is important, too. During construction, you’ll get a loan to pay electricians, plumbers, and your general contractor along the way. Inspections will be performed throughout the process by your lender. Not every bank loans money to businesses to erect a new facility, so you’ll have to shop around.

Architecture

You’ll need an architect to draw up plans for the exterior and interior of your facility. It’s important to work with experts who are familiar with steel. Metal building design contractors may have an architect on staff, or that they can recommend. Your designer will draw up plans that include the exterior of the building, the landscaping plan, the electrical and plumbing systems, and the dimensions of all the rooms. In order to be approved by your local planning and zoning department, all commercial codes must be met. During construction, the city will come out to inspect every phase of the project.

Licensed Professional

Your metal building design contractors will oversee the project. If your contractor is a general, he or she will manage all sub-contractors, inspections, and every other aspect of the project. You’ll want to work with a company with a solid reputation and ample experience. When interviewing professionals, go view other facilities they’ve constructed. Check their records with the licensing board in your region, as well. You want to assure that their license is up to date and that they don’t have any complaints against them.

Metal building design contractors can construct your steel office facility to your specifications. Once you arrange your financing and have an architect draw up the complete set of plans, you’ll be ready to start. Watching your own office facility go from idea to reality is a memorable experience.

Changing Face of Building Design in Chester

One of the new variants to have come to the forefront in just the last couple of years not only in building design in Chester, but across the globe is the concept of “green” buildings. Only a couple of decades ago if you had said to someone that you were designing a green building they would have assumed that you were going to use an army of painters to produce some ugly grass coloured monstrosity to blight the landscape.

Things have changed very rapidly in building design and “green” building issues are now firmly at the front of any designers, architects, urban planners and the general publics minds. Green building is now seen as essential to structural engineering in Chester.

The need for an open mind when building a structure is now needed to help save valuable and increasingly expensive fuel, it is also important to reduce the amount of energy that is lost though bad design and poor insulation features. Quite often with just a little consideration new building design in Chester can be adjusted to meet these energy and climate changing requirements.

Just because Chester is not one of the worlds megacities it does not mean that the local community through its local authority planners and local architects and experts in structural engineering in Chester do not have an important and even significant role to play in helping to reduce buildings energy consumption and green house gas emissions.

These experts need to carefully consider every aspect of a new buildings design not only in reference to the energy usage of the completed structure they also have to consider just how green are the materials used in construction. Many oil consuming CFC producing plastics are being abandoned in favour of alternative materials that had never been considered in British building before such as fast growing bamboo.

Building design in Chester is now starting to incorporate such features as solar panels for heating water supplies. New window and ventilation systems are being installed to maximize airflow which can dramatically help to cool buildings in the summer saving on fuel to cool the internal areas, especially in large interior open spaces.

Structural engineering in Chester is certainly making every effort to keep pace with its big city counterparts and is at the same time helping to build a greener architectural environment for Chester and its inhabitants to enjoy, with the knowledge that everything possible is being done to help secure the future for Chester’s next generation of inhabitants.

General Church Building Guidelines

The follow church building guidelines are an excerpt from the authors’ book, “Before You Build“. These church building guidelines have been compiled from a variety of sources including years of experience seeing what really works, and what doesn’t. Use these guidelines as a starting point for planning, but please note these are general guidelines for a church building program, and every one of these has exceptions and modifiers based on your particular needs.

In general, you should estimate approximately 1 acre per hundred people. This allows for your building, adequate parking, green space, recreation and storm water management. This space requirement would be greatly reduced in a metropolitan area where on-street or public parking is available.

Plan for 1 parking space for every 2.25 people on campus at one time. This will probably be less than the required parking by the city or county, but will more accurately reflect actual need. Initially you will be able to get away with less parking, however, you need to plan for adequate parking for the total capacity of the facilities, even if you decide to grow into it over time.

To get a good idea of parking requirements for a future building program, have someone go into the parking lot and count cars over a several week period along with taking a good attendance of everyone on campus. Divide the total average attendance (men, women and children) by the average number of cars. The result will probably be somewhere around 2 to 2.5 people per car. Multiply this number by the capacity of your new facility and this will tell you how many parking spaces you will eventually need in order to park everyone to fill your building to capacity.

Estimate on-site parking to be approximately 100-110 cars per acre. Structured parking (parking decks/garages) is VERY expensive. While structured parking can dramatically increase parking per acre, use only as a last resort due to the high cost of construction.

Sanctuary seating requirements typically range from 10 to 15 square feet per person, depending on layout, seating type, seating pattern, and total size of the sanctuary. Stage area should be calculated separately from seating area, which may vary greatly between churches.

Using chairs instead of pews will generally allow you to seat more people in the same space, perhaps as much as 20% more. Chairs also allow you to reconfigure your sanctuary as needed to support various types of use (weddings, Sunday morning service, events, community use, fellowship, etc.)

The Vestibule/Lobby/Narthex should be about 2 square feet per person in the worship center. Normally this will be approximately 15-20% sanctuary seating space. If you plan on running multiple services, you should consider increasing this to facilitate the “shift change”.

Classrooms range in size from 12 square feet per person (for adults) to 35 square feet per person in the room (nursery and toddlers), depending on the age group using the space.

Almost no church is built with enough storage, janitorial and working space.

A high school size basketball court is 50×84 feet. Adding modest space around the edge of the court for out of bounds, plus allowing for restrooms, storage rooms, multipurpose rooms, etc., means that you are probably looking at a minimum of 7,500-8,000 square feet of building.

Individual offices are usually recommended to be a minimum of 120 square feet and pastor’s offices a minimum of 150 square feet (with a recommended size of 300 square feet). Cubicles in open workspace areas range from approximately 48 to 105 square feet, although they may be as small as 4’x4″ (16 square feet).

Round tables in the fellowship hall will reduce seating capacity by 20% or more. In calculating space needs, plan on 12 square feet per person for square tables and 15 for round.

Overall, a building with dedicated spaces for sanctuary, fellowship, education, administration and multiuse space may require from 35-55 square feet of space per person, depending on programs, ministries and other factors.

A building with multi-purpose rooms (some rooms used for multiple purposes) may require as little as 23 square feet per person.

Plan on nearly twice the amount of restroom capacity for women than for men.

Hallways should be no less than 6 feet wide. Seriously consider wider halls if you run multiple services in order to facilitate “shift change”. This is especially important around the Sunday school rooms, and area that always seems congested.

Handicap ramps have a slope of no more than 1 inch of drop for every linear foot unless handrails are provided.

Budget approximately 10% of the building cost for new furnishings.

Generally speaking, first floor space on grade is cheaper than basement or 2nd floor space. If you have the room, it is generally better to spread out horizontally instead of vertically in order to minimize cost.

One way to estimate the cost of furniture is to take the floor plan of your new facilities and do a room-by-room inventory of what you would need to buy for that room. The easiest way to do this is in a spreadsheet with columns for room, item description, quantity, item cost and total cost (formula of quantity times item cost). Open a church supplies catalog and assign reasonable prices for each item and let the spreadsheet total the results.

None of the above points should to be construed as advice as to what to build, but only as points of reference to be used in your planning and budgeting process.

With this information, you are now equipped with some general ideas on church construction. As they say, a little knowledge can be dangerous, however, it is less dangerous than a lack of knowledge.

It is generally in the church’s best interest to find an outside consultant, either within the denomination or an independent church building consultant to help mold these general concepts into a definitive plan for your church’s building program. Outside counsel is almost always a wise move as the gap between knowing and not knowing about a matter is much smaller than the gulf between knowing something and doing it right.

Mistakes are easy to make. For more information on how to address critical church building issues, read “Before You Build: Practical Tips & Experienced Advice to Prepare Your Church for a Building Program” available for immediate free download.